Google expects 3D Live collaboration becoming mainstream

In today’s Google blog article,  the company’s representatives announced their intention to build a x 100 faster network:

“We’re planning to build and test ultra high-speed broadband networks in a small number of trial locations across the United States. We’ll deliver Internet speeds more than 100 times faster than what most Americans have access to today with 1 gigabit per second, fiber-to-the-home connections. We plan to offer service at a competitive price to at least 50,000 and potentially up to 500,000 people.”

But what are the key drivers for this initiative?

According to the same blog article, they expect 3D Live Collaboration becoming as mainstream feature as the video:

“… collaborating with classmates around the world while watching live 3-D video of a university lecture…”

Also read:

“Imagine sitting in a rural health clinic, streaming three-dimensional medical imaging over the web and discussing a unique condition with a specialist in New York. Or downloading a high-definition, full-length feature film in less than five minutes.”

We at Altadyn, developers of 3DXplorer, the first and the only Browser-based plug-in-less 3D Live Collaboration platform for events, conferences, trades shows, meetings, virtual classrooms, are obviously looking forward to seeing faster networks for improved immersive experiences.

We love this type of initiatives.

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3D in a browser, now Google’s turn again.

After Khronos group’s initiative that we commented recently, and after premature retirement of Lively (browser-based, but requiring a client installation), here’s a new initiative from Google towards “web 3D for all”, that we are glad to notice. But let’s see what is it all about:

What is O3D ?
It’s an open source API which enables creating 3D web applications using JavaScript, which works with a plug-in the user has to install on top of the browser.
Similar to Canvas 3D JS Library from Mozilla, and many other plug-in-requiring web 3D platforms (Active-X based or client based), O3D is shader-oriented, which means that experimented 3D developers will be able to achieve advanced rendering effects.

Is this a new web 3D platform ? No it’s not a platform at the same level as 3DXplorer, as it’s not offering the full 3D engine, although offering an excellent rendering engine. Moreover, there are no avatars, no multi-user session, nor chat or even a synchronous networking environment.

Which companies or technologies is this announcement aiming at:
Not only Adobe’s Flash and Microsoft’s Silverlight are concerned by this initiative, but even upper layer development  platforms requiring plug-ins are clearly aimed at, including all 3D web platforms with client installations and active-X, especially those targeting developers (Unity, 3Dvia,…)

What are other pros and cons of O3D:
Pros:
•    A great rendering engine.
•    Another initiative supporting the trend towards browser-based web3D
Cons:
•    Still requires a plug-in to be installed for the player. The market will most likely refuse it unless for very motivated users (gamers?)
•    Can’t hide the Javascript code. Most programmers  would like to protect their programs Javascript and publish their code for free.

Google’s intention is a belief that web3D is going to be browser-based, open and thin. Google actually recognizes that it would be even great without a plug-in, hoping that the plug-in will be adopted (3DXplorer is already plug-in-less). In all cases, O3D is only going to accelerate the emergence of the web 3D applications for all computers. Looking forward to seeing it in action.

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